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retirement planning

The Magic Number!

The conversation with clients about retirement income planning is much different from those conversations that occur over the years while they are building retirement assets using vehicles such as pensions, RRSPs, LIRA's, TFSAs and so on. Often, their focus is on being “conservative” because their understanding from public sources suggest that this is the appropriate approach to managing their money during retirement.

Government Pensions and Retirement Planning

Canadian couples rely upon Government pensions, CPP and Old Age Security (OAS) for a significant portion of their total retirement income planning, which can equal 20% to 50% or more, of their actual or projected total retirement incomes. Corporate and personal pensions (such as RRSPs and TFSAs and other savings) are other sources of retirement income from a planning perspective.

Helping Elderly Parents Manage Their Money

It is always a difficult transition when people move from being the ones taking care of their family to the position where their family takes care of them. This is especially true when it comes to finances.

Because these changes usually happen very gradually, many adult children do not immediately recognize the need their parents may have for additional help with managing their finances. In many cases, aging parents simply don’t feel comfortable asking children or other family members for help.

Investment Risk in Retirement Years

As Joe Farnsworth* from Toronto discovered, published return percentages do not necessarily tell the whole story of an investment portfolio performance. Joe retired 9 years ago from the Toronto Police Service from which he collects a serviceable pension each month.

Long-Term Care Solutions

There is a common misconception that, if left unaddressed, can having a devastating effect an individual’s long-term financial well-being. It is the belief that long-term care costs are fully covered by provincial health care plans if you or a loved one ever need this special type of care.

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Unfortunately, this is simply not the case. While programs do exist to cover some needs like these, most of the burden of long-term care costs usually fall to the individual or their family members.

Mental Health Impacts Retirement Planning Strategies

The unfortunate truth about aging is that the human brain deteriorates as we age. While the process is vastly different depending on the individual and their health and circumstances, the rate of deterioration cannot be predicted with any level of certainty. It doesn’t cater to genetics, family history, or life habits.

Selecting the Right Retirement Destination

Choosing a retirement location can be a stressful experience, especially when you combine your own questions with the pressures you might be receiving from loved ones to live near them. Here are ten tips to help ensure that your retired life is as wonderful as it can be.

Retirement Savings Late Starter?

Harry and Sally both earned high incomes and liked to live the good life. They leased higher end European cars, took two-week exotic vacations almost every year, and lived in a house much larger than they truly needed. To accomplish this lifestyle, they put off retirement savings. Now in their forties, Harry and Sally are realizing they have some catching up to do. Listed below are a few things to consider:

Delay no more - Procrastination or bad breaks may have derailed a savings plan. Now is the time to make savings a priority.

Traveling in Retirement

One of the top retirement goals for many is travel. As many as 1.5 million so called "snowbirds" travel to the Southern United States during the winter. With summer just around the corner, thoughts turn to travel within our borders, too. The Canada Safety Council states that a few simple precautions can help ensure a safe, healthy and enjoyable trip any time of the year.

The Quick Start RRSP

Maureen, age 20, figures she can save $400 each month; or she can keep frittering it away at the mall. She lives with her parents and they think she should save it. Dad says, "Put it into an RRSP and get a tax break as well." Her friends think RRSPs are for old fogies and she doesn't need to start thinking about retirement savings until she's 30.

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